Walkway and viewing platform to protect hidden gem

Tucked away on the North West side of North Stradbroke Island, is a hidden gem known as Myora Springs, which has long had a cultural significance for the Traditional Owner group here, the Quandamooka people, who locally refer to this site as Capembah Springs, which refers to the big hill just south of the Spring.

With a nationally endangered littoral rainforest on one side, and sheltering mangroves on the other, the unique natural beauty of these springs has made it a popular water hole, frequently visited by some of the local schools and universities.

To ensure preservation of this unique spot for future generations, a need was identified to help manage some of the unintentional erosion and a loss of vegetation, including mangrove dieback, that was occurring due to a high number of visitors walking across the area.

Myora Springs pre works

Myora Springs pre works

In consultation with the Quandamooka people, who were keen for this unique ecosystem to continue to be shared and enjoyed amongst the local community and tourists alike, it was decided to build an environmentally sensitive designed raised walkway and viewing platform, which keeps visitors off areas prone to erosion.

Seriously eroded areas along the banks of the spring have been stabilised using an engineered design of geofabrics and sand bagging, and will be planted with rainforest species that would otherwise naturally occur here.

Myora Sandbags

Myora Sandbags

Home to species such as the endangered swamp orchid (Phaius australis) and vulnerable water mouse (Xeromys myoides), Myora Springs, is also an area where Quandamooka people used to gather for thousands of years, due to its abundance of important foods such as shell fish. Consequently, shell middens are often encountered here.

Early commencement of this work meant that damage experienced during the passing of Ex Tropical Cyclone Oswald was largely minimised. Had it been left unmanaged, it is likely that much larger amounts of sediment and mud would have washed into the spring and Moreton Bay, and the rainforest community that hugs the banks of the spring would have been at high risk from collapsing.

The works at Myora Springs were coordinated by SEQ Catchments with funding from the Australian Government Caring for our Country Program along with partners OceanWatch Australia, Wetlandcare Australia, Healthy Waterways, Redland City Council, and the Quandamooka Yoolooburrabee Aboriginal Corporation.